Menorah - SOLD

Menora is an original Contemporary Artwork realized by Max Ernst (2 April 1891 – 1 April 1976) in 1971.

Original Color Lithograph on Wove paper.

Total Dimensions: 62 x 52 cm.

Hand-signed by the artist on the lower right corner in pencil: "Max Ernst"; numbered on the lower left corner in pencil: '8/99'.

Edition of 99 prints.

Reference: Spies / Leppien, No. A 28 III.

Good conditions.  

Discover More Interesting Artworks On Wallector.com! 

Request Price
Out of stock
SKU
T-121018
More Information
Artist Max Ernst
Typology Original Prints
Technique Lithograph
Period 1970s
Signature Hand Signed
Conditions Good (minor cosmetic wear)
Dimensions (cm) 32.5 x 23.5 x 0.1

Menorah is an original Contemporary Artwork realized by Max Ernst (2 April 1891 – 1 April 1976) in 1971.

Original Color Lithograph on Wove paper.

Total Dimensions: 62 x 52 cm.

Hand-signed by the artist on the lower right corner in pencil: "Max Ernst"; numbered on the lower left corner in pencil: '8/99'.

Edition of 99 prints.

Includes passepartout.

Reference: Spies / Leppien, No. A 28 III.

Good conditions.  

Discover More Interesting Artworks On Wallector.com! 

Menora is an original Contemporary Artwork that depicts, in the Jewish religion, an object that holds seven or nine candles, used in religious celebrations. The work is from the series "Judith" by Jean Giradoux. Judith is a play written in 1931 by French dramatist Jean Giraudoux. Judith was translated into English by John K. Savacool, in The Modern Theatre, ed. Eric Bentley, vol. 3 (1955), and by Christopher Fry, in The Drama of Jean Giraudoux, vol. 1 (1963). He was first performed on 4 November 1931 in Paris at the Théâtre Pigalle in a production by Louis Jouvet

Max Ernst (2 April 1891 – 1 April 1976); he was a German (naturalised American in 1948 and French in 1958) painter, sculptor, graphic artist, and poet. A prolific artist, Ernst was a primary pioneer of the Dada movement and surrealism. He had no formal artistic training, but his experimental attitude toward the making of art resulted in his invention of frottage—a technique that uses pencil rubbings of objects as a source of images—and grattage, an analogous technique in which paint is scraped across canvas to reveal the imprints of the objects placed beneath. He is also noted for his novels consisting of collages. Closely associated with Dada and Surrealism, Max Ernst made paintings, sculptures, and prints depicting fantastic, nightmarish images that often made reference to anxieties originating in childhood. Ernst demonstrated a profound interest in Freudian psychoanalysis, which is apparent in his exploration of Automatism and his invention of the Frottage technique. The artist’s psychoanalytic leanings are evident in his iconic 1923 work Pietà, or Revolution by Night, in which Ernst substitutes the image of Mary cradling the body of Christ with a depiction of the artist himself held by his father. Much of the artist’s work defied societal norms, Christian morality, and the aesthetic standards of Western academic art.

Secure and Fast Shipping

Tracked international shipping

Purchase protection

Fully protected from checkout to delivery

Collector Guarantee

Original items certified by our curators